School Discipline

Keeping Kids in Class: Arkansas Ally Releases In-Depth Analysis of School Discipline

Posted on: Thursday February 14th, 2013

Black students in Arkansas schools are more likely to be suspended and receive corporal punishment than their white counterparts, according to this comprehensive state-level analysis from Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families (AACF), a member of the AR OTL Campaign. School disciplinary policies that disproportionately keep students of color out of school reduce their opportunities to learn and increase gaps in educational achievement. As this report shows, Arkansas schools rely far too often on disciplinary approaches that bar students from the classroom.

Black students in Arkansas schools are more likely to be suspended and receive corporal punishment than their White counterparts, according to a new report from Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families (AACF), a member of the AR OTL Campaign.

SOTU: The Commander-in-Chief — and the Battle for Public Education

Posted on: Thursday January 26th, 2012

During Tuesday night's State of the Union Address, President Obama touched on education issues at several points in his speech. The Schott Foundation for Public Education today released its response to the President's education message.

 During Tuesday night's State of the Union Address, President Obama touched on education issues at several points in his speech. The Schott Foundation for Public Education today released its response to the President's education message:

$2.4 Million for Restorative Justice in NYC Schools

Posted on: Wednesday July 1st, 2015

Grassroots organizers in New York City have been fighting for school discipline reform for years, and their hard work paid off this week when the City Council passed next year's budget with $2.4 million in funding for restorative justice programs.

Grassroots organizers in New York City have been fighting for school discipline reform for years, and their hard work paid off this week when the City Council passed next year's budget with $2.4 million in funding for restorative justice programs.

Proposed NYC Bill Would Be a Setback in School Discipline Reform

Posted on: Monday June 22nd, 2015

The New York City Council is considering a bill that would use public school funding to provide NY Police Department safety agents to private schools. In response, Kesi Foster, Coordinator for the Urban Youth Collaborative, wrote an op-ed arguing this bill not only hurts public schools financially, but also directly contributes to the school-to-prison pipeline.

UYC LogoThe New York City Council is considering a bill that would use public school funding to provide NY Police Department safety agents to private schools. In response, Kesi Foster, Coordinator for the Urban Youth Collaborative, wrote an op-ed recently arguing this bill not only hurts public schools financially, but also directly contributes to the school-to-prison pipeline.

Powerful Speech on School Discipline in NYC

Posted on: Monday June 22nd, 2015

Youth organizer Jaritza Geigel gave a powerful speech in New York last week about her own personal experiences with harsh school discipline, its devastating and disproportionate impact on students of color, and the work done thus far to combat it.


Jaritza Geigel | Picture via Make the Road NY

School Discipline Report Card Released for Denver Colorado

Posted on: Wednesday June 3rd, 2015

Several years after the grassroots organization Padres y Jóvenes Unidos won district-wide school discipline reform in Denver, they've released their 4th annual "Denver Community Accountability Report Card," tracking schools' progress in implementing those hard-won reforms.

4th Annual Denver Community Accountability Report CardThe grassroots organization Padres y Jóvenes Unidos (PJU) won district-wide school discipline reform for Denver Colorado a few years ago.

Powerful Video Reaffirms That #BlackGirlsMatter

Posted on: Monday June 1st, 2015

The African American Policy Forum, Advancement Project, Dream Defenders, and others released a new video that powerfully reaffirms the multitude of reasons why #BlackGirlsMatter. In the wake of high-profile police violence against black men and boys, and thanks to initiatives like President Obama's My Brother's Keeper initiative, national attention has begun to focus on the myriad problems black boys face. However, these efforts often ignore black girls, who face not only the same systemic racism, but also sexism.

The Dream Defender's #BlackGirlsMatter VideoThe African American Policy Forum, Advancement Project, Dream Defenders, and others released a new video that powerfully reaffirms the multitude of reasons why #BlackGirlsMatter.

MS Still Struggling with Discriminatory School Discipline

Posted on: Friday May 29th, 2015

Thena Robinson-Mock, project director for the Advancement Project, provides an important update to the school discipline crisis in Mississippi in her recent op-ed for The Clarion-Ledger. Two years ago the Advancement Project, the ACLU, and the Mississippi NAACP jointly released a report exposing the state's extreme school-to-prison pipeline, and the discriminatory impact it had in particular on students of color. Unfortunately, Robinson-Mock writes that although some progress has been made, much still needs to be done to solve this problem.

Thena Robinson-Mock
Thena Robinson-Mock

Groundbreaking School Discipline Bill Passes Illinois Legislature

Posted on: Thursday May 28th, 2015

Voice of Youth in Chicago Education deserves tremendous praise for their latest victory—passing a groundbreaking school discipline reform bill through the Illinois Legislature. By ending the use of "zero tolerance" policies and restricting administrators' use of suspensions and expulsions, VOYCE's bill will help make Illinois schools more welcoming environments for students.

Voice of Youth in Chicago Education (VOYCE) deserves tremendous praise for their latest victory—passing a groundbreaking school discipline reform bill through the Illinois Legislature. This bill is sorely needed, as Chicago schools struggle with the overuse of harsh school disciplinary practices that are disproportionately levied against students of color.

Zero-Tolerance Discipline and College Admissions

Posted on: Thursday May 28th, 2015

A recent editorial in the New York Times highlights the long-term consequences of "zero-tolerance" school discipline and how they can extend beyond the K-12 system and hurt students' chances of being accepted into college.

Often, when we talk about the impact of harsh school discipline policies, we talk about the short-run. We highlight how suspensions are disproportionately handed out to students of color, students with disabilities and LGBTQ students, often for minor, nonviolent misbehaviors, and this alienates students from the classroom and makes it more likely that they drop out of school. 

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