School Discipline

Keeping Kids in Class: Arkansas Ally Releases In-Depth Analysis of School Discipline

Posted on: Thursday February 14th, 2013

Black students in Arkansas schools are more likely to be suspended and receive corporal punishment than their white counterparts, according to this comprehensive state-level analysis from Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families (AACF), a member of the AR OTL Campaign. School disciplinary policies that disproportionately keep students of color out of school reduce their opportunities to learn and increase gaps in educational achievement. As this report shows, Arkansas schools rely far too often on disciplinary approaches that bar students from the classroom.

Black students in Arkansas schools are more likely to be suspended and receive corporal punishment than their White counterparts, according to a new report from Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families (AACF), a member of the AR OTL Campaign.

SOTU: The Commander-in-Chief — and the Battle for Public Education

Posted on: Thursday January 26th, 2012

During Tuesday night's State of the Union Address, President Obama touched on education issues at several points in his speech. The Schott Foundation for Public Education today released its response to the President's education message.

 During Tuesday night's State of the Union Address, President Obama touched on education issues at several points in his speech. The Schott Foundation for Public Education today released its response to the President's education message:

Schools Not Prisons: #DoTheMath

Posted on: Friday September 12th, 2014

In California it costs $62,300 per year to imprison someone, but just $9,100 per year to teach a child. A powerful short video from Californians for Safety and Justice challenges us to "do the math" when it comes to expanding the criminal justice system or investing in schools.

In California it costs $62,300 per year to imprison someone, but just $9,100 per year to teach a child. A powerful short video from Californians for Safety and Justice challenges us to "do the math" when it comes to expanding the criminal justice system or investing in schools.

Watch the video below!

Gallup: 70% of Americans Want Federally Funded Universal Pre-K

Posted on: Friday September 12th, 2014

Pre-k has always played well in public debate, but a new Gallup polls show just how much people like pre-k and how much they want to see it expanded. According to Gallup, 70% of Americans favor using federal money to fund universal pre-k.

Pre-k has always played well in public debate – who can argue with spending time and money on adorable young kids? But a new Gallup polls shows just how much people like pre-k and how much they want to see it expanded.

According to Gallup, 70% of Americans favor using federal money to fund universal pre-k.

Gallup Pre-K

Schools Not Prisons: #DoTheMath

Publication Date: 
Fri, 2014-09-12

In California it costs $62,300 per year to imprison someone, but just $9,100 per year to teach a child. A new video from Californians for Safety and Justice challenges us to "do the math" when it comes to expanding the criminal justice system or investing in schools.

In California it costs $62,300 per year to imprison someone, but just $9,100 per year to teach a child. A new video from Californians for Safety and Justice challenges us to "do the math" when it comes to expanding the criminal justice system or investing in schools.

See video

NYC Students Start School Without New Discipline Code

Posted on: Wednesday September 3rd, 2014

By Dignity in Schools Campaign - New York

1.1 million New York City students started the school year without a new discipline code. DSC-NY, with the support of 16 City Council members and two state assembly members, is calling on the Department of Education and the de Blasio administration to limit punitive discipline practices and promote positive school climates.

p>Dignity in Schools CampaignThe following statement was originally issued by the Dignity in Schools Campaign, an OTL ally.

Police Brutality is an Education Justice Issue

Posted on: Thursday August 21st, 2014

The recent murder of Michael Brown by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, has sparked anger and protests across the country. It has led to important conversations about the criminalization of youth of color, the militarization of the police and what we can do to end such injustices.

This post originally appeared on the Alliance to Reclaim Our Schools (AROS) blog. The OTL Campaign is a member of AROS. 

It's Time to Abandon Zero-Tolerance Discipline

Posted on: Thursday August 7th, 2014

In a recent commentary for Education Week, Kavitha Mediratta of Atlantic Philanthropies writes about the problems in our nation's discipline system – and the cities and communities that are changing things for the better.


Kavitha Mediratta

The movement to reform harsh, discriminatory school discipline policies in our nation's schools is picking up steam, with calls for change coming from grassroots organizers nationwide all the way up to the US Departments of Education and Justice.

Netroots Nation Takes on School Discipline

Posted on: Friday July 25th, 2014

Across the country, students, parents, and educators are organizing to change their school districts’ zero tolerance policies – and they’re winning. At the 2014 Netroots Nation conference in Detroit last weekend, advocates and organizers discussed the victories and continuing challenges in the movement for school discipline reform.

Across the country, students, parents, and educators are organizing to change their school districts’ zero tolerance policies – and they’re winning, with recent victories nationwide from Los Angeles to Denver to Maryland and Boston.

At the 2014 Netroots Nation conference in Detroit last weekend, advocates and organizers discussed the victories and continuing challenges in the movement for school discipline reform. 

How We Won School Discipline Reform in Massachusetts

Posted on: Wednesday July 23rd, 2014

By Tom Mela, Massachusetts Advocates for Children

On July 1, Massachusetts took a bold step forward in the national school discipline reform movement when its new Chapter 222 law went into effect. To help advocates in other states learn how they, too, might tackle the school-to-prison pipeline, here’s how our Massachusetts coalition came together, fought hard, and won reform.

This guest post was written by Tom Mela, Senior Project Director at Massachusetts Advcoates for Children (MAC)