Colorado

The State of Preschool 2011

Publication Date: 
Tue, 2012-04-10
Author: 
National Institute for Early Education Research
Type: 
Report
Category: 
Early Care and Education

This report from the National Institute for Early Education Research analyzes national and state statistics and trends on the availabilty of quality Pre-K programs across the country. The report includes detailed state profiles that measure not just access access to early education opportunities but also whether available Pre-K programs meet a set of 10 benchmarks for quality. 

More Kids in Pre-K, But Less Per-Student Funding

Posted on: Tuesday April 10th, 2012

According to a new report, Pre-K enrollment has doubled in the U.S. over the past ten years. But because of budget cuts, state per-child spending for Pre-K programs has decreased dramatically. 

The good news: More students than ever are enrolled in Pre-K programs in the U.S. The bad news: The rising number of Pre-K students coupled with state education budget cuts across the country has drastically reduced per-child spending on Pre-K programs.  

Gambling on National Security

Posted on: Friday March 30th, 2012

The stakes are high in education reform, what with needing to adequately prepare our children to maintain our nation's economic vitality, international competitiveness and democratic vibrancy. But the policymakers that are pushing for more privatization in our public schools are gambling our children's education - and our nation's future - on a lousy hand of reform policies. 

If policymakers want to play a bit of poker, they should save their gambling for the card table and keep it out of education reform. In a Huffington Post column, Schott Foundation President and CEO John Jackson calls the weak hand of the policymakers who are pushing for more privatization in our nation's public schools. 

Teacher Opinion and Research Ignored in Ed Debate

Posted on: Monday March 26th, 2012

How is it that education policymakers can profess to respect teachers while at the same time ignoring national teacher opinion polls and instead supporting policies like merit pay based on test scores, competitive grants, and the expansion of online learning and charter schools?

How is it that education policymakers can profess to respect teachers while at the same time ignoring national teacher opinion polls and instead supporting policies like merit pay based on test scores, competitive grants, and the expansion of online learning and charter schools?

Parent and Community Organizing Pays Off

Posted on: Wednesday March 21st, 2012

If you ever doubt the ability of community organizing to influence debates on public education reform, check out some of these recent success stories. From Pennsylvania to Florida, parent, students and educators across the country are influencing public will and making their voices heard in their local governments. 

Over the past couple of weeks, we've posted about different examples of successful community organizing from across the country and they're worth highlighting again all in one blog post as proof of the power of grassroots organizing. 

Evaluating Teacher Evaluations

Publication Date: 
Wed, 2012-03-21
Author: 
Linda Darling-Hammond, Audrey Amrein-Beardsley, Edward Haertel and Jess Rothstein
Type: 
Report
Category: 
Highly Effective Teachers

 "Evaluating Teacher Evaluations," published in Phi Delta Kappan is a great tool for understanding value-added rating models and how they fail to account for the vast number of factors that influence a student's test scores from one year to the next. Since value-added models can't control for factors like class size, home and community challenges, summer learning loss (which disproportionately affects low-income students), then there is no way they can provide an accurate picture of how effective a teacher is in raising student test scores. 

Evaluating Value-Added Teacher Evaluations

Posted on: Tuesday March 20th, 2012

Value-added teacher rating models fail to account for the vast number of factors that influence student test scores from one year to the next. Since they can't control for factors like class size, home and community challenges, summer learning loss (which disproportionately affects low-income students), then there is no way they can provide an accurate picture of how effective a teacher is in raising student test scores. 

New York City recently joined the Los Angles Unified School District in making value-added teacher ratings open to the public despite significant evidence that value-added scores are riddled with errors and inconsistencies.The scores were subsequently published in major newspapers in each city, mislabling teachers publicly and proving that there needs to be more that goes into determining the "value" of a teacher than "value-added" scores.

Montgomery Co. Model for Union Collaboration

Posted on: Tuesday March 20th, 2012

The Montgomery County public school district is a model for collaboration between teacher unions and administrators, and it provides a strong argument against corporate-style reform efforts that antagonize and seek to dismantle unions.

Montgomery County School District has gotten a lot of attention for its successful efforts to improve graduation rates and narrow the achievement gap. But Montgomery is also a model for collaboration between teacher unions and administrators, and it provides a strong argument against corporate-style reform efforts that antagonize and seek to dismantle unions.

OCR Data Reveals Major Inequities for Students of Color

Posted on: Thursday March 8th, 2012

Updated with new resources - No good news from Washington this week as the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights released unsettling new data that paints a stark picture of the opportunity gap facing students of color. From school discipline policies and teacher equity to grade retention and access to and participation in algebra classes and gifted programs, students of color are disproportionately - and negatively - affected.

[UPDATED with additional resources]

Teacher Job Satisfaction Plummets

Posted on: Wednesday March 7th, 2012

With teachers and the teaching profession being attacked and denigrated by politicians across the country, we're lucky teacher job satisfaction has only dropped 15 percent on the annual MetLife Survey of the American Teacher.

What with being attacked left and right by politicians across the country, who can blame teachers for being more than a little unsatisfied with their jobs. According to the annual MetLife Survey of the American Teacher, the drop in teacher job satisfaction over the past two years is a whomping 15 points - from 59 percent in 2009 to just 44 percent in 2011.

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