Indiana

Today's children can't wait 80 years for progress

Posted on: Wednesday November 9th, 2011

By Michael Holzman, Senior Research Consultant, The Schott Foundation for Public Education

The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) shows little change from the achievement gaps recorded in 2009. At this rate it will take 30 years in Grade 4 Reading and 50 years in Grade 4 Mathematics for the gap to close at that level and 80 years in Grade 8 Reading and more than 30 years in Grade 8 Mathematics.

Think and "act" locally: Pressing school boards to erase opportunity gaps

Posted on: Thursday November 3rd, 2011

By Edwin C. Darden, Director of Education Law and Policy, Appleseed

Appleseed has developed an assessment tool that helps expose inequities. Called the Resource Equity Assessment Document (READ), the tool will be distributed to community partners and school boards to spur action. When armed with data that makes the case for change, community organizations can help school boards reset the balance between impoverished and better-off students.

Why do schools in high-poverty neighborhoods have fewer textbooks, foreign language offerings, Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate courses, and smaller libraries than schools in middle-class neighborhoods? Why do wealthier kids have teachers and principals with more credentials, experience and talent? And more importantly, how do we make change happen so all students can proceed from the same starting line?

A Primer on Corporate School Reform

Publication Date: 
Thu, 2011-10-27
Author: 
Stan Karp
Organization: 
Education Law Center
Type: 
Report

This is an edited version of a commentary given by Stan Karp , a teacher of English and journalism in Paterson, N.J., for 30 years. Karp spoke on Oct. 1 at the fourth annual Northwest Teachers for Justice conference in Seattle. He is now the director of the Secondary Reform Project for New Jersey’s Education Law Center and an editor of the 25-year-old Rethinking Schools magazine. A video and fuller version of the commentary can be found here.

This is an edited version of a commentary given by Stan Karp , a teacher of English and journalism in Paterson, N.J., for 30 years. Karp spoke on Oct. 1 at the fourth annual Northwest Teachers for Justice conference in Seattle. He is now the director of the Secondary Reform Project for New Jersey’s Education Law Center and an editor of the 25-year-old Rethinking Schools magazine.

Corporate reform attitude hurting public education

Posted on: Tuesday November 1st, 2011

"Corporate reform" isn't doing anything good for public education, says Stan Karp, the director of the Secondary Reform Project for New Jersey's Education Law Center. Speaking at the Northwest Teachers for Social Justice Conference in October, Karp criticized the corporate attitude that is guiding major "reform" legislation. 

Need a quick primer on "corporate reform" in public education and its consequences? Stan Karp's got you covered. The director of the Secondary Reform Project for New Jersey's Education Law Center, Karp spoke last month at the Northwest Teachers for Social Justice Conference, criticizing the corporate attitude that is guiding major "reform" legislation.

Community leadership key to school turnaround

Posted on: Monday October 31st, 2011

Tina Dove, Director, National Opportunity to Learn Campaign

The nation is not going to improve the educational outcomes and lifetime opportunities of its neediest citizens until we turn around our lowest-performing schools. The question has been – and remains: How do we do that? Under the federal School Improvement Grant program, the answer is for schools that are targeted for the grants to adopt one of four school improvement models, ranging from a purge of school leadership to closing the school. Communities for Excellent Public Schools and a growing list of community-based organizations in low-income communities of color across the country have signed a petition urging Secretary of Education Arne Duncan to consider a different solution to turn around schools and sustain improved performance.

The nation is not going to improve the educational outcomes and lifetime opportunities of its neediest citizens until we turn around our lowest-performing schools. The question has been – and remains: How do we do that?

Under the federal School Improvement Grant (SIG) program, the answer is for schools that are targeted for the grants to adopt one of four school improvement models, ranging from a purge of school leadership to closing the school.