Louisiana

Raise Your Hand Campaign

Posted on: Friday March 30th, 2012

The Raise Your Hand Campaign is a student-led research initiative in New Orleans schools that pulled together student testimony and research from 6 different public high schools and examined the opportunities, or lack thereof, available to students in the years after Hurricane Katrina devastated the city. The report examines everything from teaching quality and student support services to physical environment and school food, and gives each school a report card and recommendations for improvement. 

The Raise Your Hand Campaign is a student-led research initiative in New Orleans schools that pulled together student testimony and research from 6 different public high schools and examined the opportunities, or lack thereof, available to students in the years after Hurricane Katrina devastated the city. The report examines everything from teaching quality and student support services to physical environment and school food, and gives each school a report card and recommendations for improvement.

Tags:

A new approach to expanded learning time

Posted on: Thursday December 15th, 2011

By Lucy Friedman, Founding President of TASC (The After-School Corporation)

A growing body of research shows that the typical six-hour school day just doesn’t cut it for many students. Too many schools lack the time and funds for arts, recess or inquiry-driven projects that inspire a life-long love of learning and provide skills needed to be competitive in the 21st century. The challenges and needs are particularly dramatic in low-income communities where students are the most likely to be behind grade level and who stand to benefit most from additional learning time. ExpandED Schools is a promising new model to help reinvent schools that are struggling to deliver on the promise of high-quality education for all students.

A growing body of research shows that the typical six-hour school day just doesn’t cut it for many students. Too many schools lack the time and funds for arts, recess or inquiry-driven projects that inspire a life-long love of learning and provide skills needed to be competitive in the 21st century.

The challenges and needs are particularly dramatic in low-income communities where students are the most likely to be behind grade level and who stand to benefit most from additional learning time. 

Lost Opportunity 50 State Report

Publication Date: 
Wed, 2009-09-23
Type: 
Report

In Lost Opportunity: A 50 State Report on the Opportunity to Learn in America, the Schott Foundation for Public Education establishes a metric for determining the opportunity to learn for students. Providing a state-by-state comparison of both academic proficiency (percentage of students scoring at or above proficient on the eighth grade NAEP reading exam) and equity (as measured by the Schott Foundation’s Opportunity to Learn Index, or OTLI), Lost Opportunity identifies the four baseline minimum resources that are necessary for a child – regardless of race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status – to have a fair and substantive Opportunity to Learn.

In the United States, every student should have the equal right to a high-quality education.  But as our most recent data demonstrates, for far too many students, quality and equity are aspirations, not realities.  Few states are providing public school educations that result in academic proficiency for students.  And even fewer states are providing access to a high-quality education to all students, particularly those from historically disadvantaged groups.

Gina Womack: How to End the School-to-Prison Pipeline

Posted on: Thursday November 14th, 2013

Gina Womack, Executive Director of Families and Friends of Louisiana's Incarcerated Children, is speaking tonight at Wheelock College in Boston about how to end the school-to-prison pipeline.

If you live in the Boston area, you should come see Gina Womack, Executive Director of Families and Friends of Louisiana's Incarcerated Children (FFLIC), speak tonight at Wheelock College about how to end the school-to-prison pipeline. FFLIC is a leading voice in the South for children, particularly those in or targeted by the juvenile justice system. 

From Wheelock:

Mass School Closures Are "Shock Doctrine" for Education

Posted on: Wednesday October 9th, 2013

Mass school closures are the "shock doctrine" of the education world. But parents, students, teachers and communities are fighting back to ensure their public schools receive the investments and supports they need to succeed.

When 9-year-old Asean Johnson gave his now-famous, fiery speech last spring at a rally to protest the mass closure of 49 Chicago public schools, he drew enough national attention that his school, at least, was spared.

New Orleans Schools Not Supporting ELL Families

Posted on: Wednesday August 7th, 2013

A new complaint filed by the Vietnamese American Young Leaders Association (VAYLA),  an OTL ally, criticizes schools operating in East New Orleans for failing to meet the language needs of Asian American and Latino students and parents with limited English. The complaint is the culmination of more than two years of investigation into the educational equity and access issues for limited-English speaking communities in New Orleans.

For parents to be involved in their child's education, it helps if they have access to things like enrollment information, report cards, parent-teacher conferences, major school events, disciplinary action, and student services. But non-English speaking parents don't always get that access because schools don't always provide translation services or translated materials, thereby limiting how much those parents can help and support their children.

2013 KIDS COUNT Data Book

Publication Date: 
Tue, 2013-07-09
Organization: 
Annie E. Casey Foundation
Type: 
Data
Category: 
Early Care and Education

The 2013 KIDS COUNT Data Book provides a detailed picture of how children are faring in the United States. In addition to ranking states on overall child well-being, the Data Book ranks states in four domains: Economic Well-Being, Education, Health, and Family and Community.

An Education Declaration to Rebuild America

Posted on: Friday June 14th, 2013

Every revolution needs a declaration. Against a backdrop of surging grassroots discontent with how the nation's K-12 public schools are currently governed, a diverse coalition of leaders from across the country have joined in support of "An Education Declaration to Rebuild America."

Banner

Diverse Education Network Rejects 30 Years of Failed Policy,
Calls for New Direction Based on Research, Equity & Supports

Sign on and add your voice!

Ending Suspensions Is a Team Effort

Posted on: Monday June 3rd, 2013

In an inspiring display of cross-sector collaboration, the New York City School-Justice Partnership Task Force has released an action plan for NYC officials to reduce the use of suspensions, summonses, and arrests by building common cause between different agencies and communities and implementing positive discipline strategies.

Cross-Sector Advocates Release Action Plan for Reducing Suspensions in NYC
Highlights Positive Discipline Strategies from Across the Nation

The "Dirty Dozen": How Charters Influence Enrollment

Posted on: Wednesday May 29th, 2013

Proponents of charter schools and charter expansion consistently overlook serious issues with how these schools can selectively shape their student enrollment. A report from the National Education Policy Center describes 12 practices that charter schools use to push out or discourage enrollment of students with special needs, those with low test scores, English learners, or students in poverty.

Charter schools get a lot of hype in our nation's education debate, yet proponents of charter expansion consistently overlook serious issues with how these schools can selectively shape their student enrollment.