Maine

OCR Data Reveals Major Inequities for Students of Color

Posted on: Thursday March 8th, 2012

Updated with new resources - No good news from Washington this week as the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights released unsettling new data that paints a stark picture of the opportunity gap facing students of color. From school discipline policies and teacher equity to grade retention and access to and participation in algebra classes and gifted programs, students of color are disproportionately - and negatively - affected.

[UPDATED with additional resources]

Teacher Job Satisfaction Plummets

Posted on: Wednesday March 7th, 2012

With teachers and the teaching profession being attacked and denigrated by politicians across the country, we're lucky teacher job satisfaction has only dropped 15 percent on the annual MetLife Survey of the American Teacher.

What with being attacked left and right by politicians across the country, who can blame teachers for being more than a little unsatisfied with their jobs. According to the annual MetLife Survey of the American Teacher, the drop in teacher job satisfaction over the past two years is a whomping 15 points - from 59 percent in 2009 to just 44 percent in 2011.

Occupy Education: National Day of Action

Posted on: Thursday March 1st, 2012

Targeting one of the most dire inequalities facing our nation - access to quality education - the Occupy Movement is holding a national day of action focused on education. From Albany to Sacramento, students, parents and educators across the country are staging walkouts and marches to departments of education on behalf of equitable funding to provide all students with an equal opportunity to learn. 

Targeting one of the most dire inequalities facing our nation - access to quality education - the Occupy Movement is holding a national day of action focused on education. From Albany to Sacramento, students, parents and educators across the country are staging walkouts and marches to departments of education on behalf of equitable funding to provide all students with an equal opportunity to learn.

Stealing an Opportunity to Learn

Posted on: Wednesday February 29th, 2012

Michael Holzman, Senior Research Consultant, The Schott Foundation for Public Education

Tanya McDowell, the Connecticut mother who was accused of fraudulently enrolling her son in a better school, only wanted what was best for her child in a world where ethnicity and local income are strongly linked to the quality of schools and opportunities available to students. 

Earlier this week Tanya McDowell, the Bridgeport, Connecticut, mother accused of fraudulently enrolling her son in a Norwalk school, was sentenced to prison and must pay $6,200 to the city of Norwalk for stealing a better education for her son.

The case parallels a similar one in Ohio.

CDF Data: Access to Full-Day Kindergarten in the U.S.

Posted on: Wednesday February 22nd, 2012

This insightful infographic from the Children's Defense Funds lays out a child's access, or lack thereof, to full-day kindergarten in every state, breaking down early childhood education programs by availability and whether the programs are funded by the state or out of pocket by parents.

This insightful infographic from the Children's Defense Fund lays out a child's access, or lack thereof, to full-day kindergarten in every state, breaking down early childhood education programs by availability and whether the programs are funded by the state or out of pocket by parents.

Right Problem, Wrong Solution

Posted on: Friday February 17th, 2012

By John Jackson, President & CEO, Schott Foundation for Public Education

While the Schott Foundation is pleased that Kentucky legislators are reviewing its data to address the alarming low graduation rate of African American males, we are concerned that they are considering the wrong solution to the problem: charter schools.

While the Schott Foundation is pleased that Kentucky legislators are reviewing its data to address the alarming low graduation rate of African American males, we are concerned that they are considering the wrong solution to the problem: charter schools. The opportunity gap that has led to the persistent achievement gap between students of color and their White peers is a systemic problem.

Annenberg Institute Issues Game-Changing Strategy Guide to Quality Teaching

Posted on: Thursday February 16th, 2012

Striding into the hottest topic in public education, Brown University’s Annenberg Institute for School Reform today issued “Straight Talk on Teaching Quality: Six Game-Changing Ideas and What to Do About Them,” a concise guide for improving teaching effectiveness.

The following is a press release from the Annenberg Institute for School Reform concerning their new, must-read guide to teacher quality in educaiton reform. You can download the PDF of the guide here.

What the Increasing Income-Related Achievement Gap Really Means

Posted on: Wednesday February 15th, 2012

By Michael Holzman, Senior Research Consultant, The Schott Foundation for Public Education

The growing achievement gap between rich and poor children, which has garnered significant attention from the media following a Standford University report, is being driven by rising poverty rates among children of color.

A recent research report by Sean Reardon of the Center for Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University has received much publicity, including a major article in the New York Times.

Vouchers - Overview




 Vouchers – as well as state-sponsored tax-credit programs that support private schools – are not the answer to ensuring America’s children have a fair and substantive opportunity to learn. These programs divert resources from public schools, affect a limited number of students and, most studies show, don’t improve children’s educational experiences.

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