Massachusetts

Losing Ground: School Segregation in Massachusetts

Publication Date: 
Thu, 2013-05-09
Author: 
Jennifer B. Ayscue and Alyssa Greenberg with John Juscera and Genevieve Siegel-Hawley
Organization: 
Civil Rights Project
Type: 
Report
Category: 
Equitable instructional materials and policies

While student enrollment in Massachusetts public schools is growing more diverse, the state's public schools are becoming increasingly segregated along race and class lines. The inequality of educational opportunities and outcomes is compounded when, as is usually the case, racially segregated schools are also schools of concentrated poverty. This report explores two decades of school segregation trends in the state and provides recommendations for policymakers and advocates.

Lost Opportunity 50 State Report

Publication Date: 
Wed, 2009-09-23
Type: 
Report

In Lost Opportunity: A 50 State Report on the Opportunity to Learn in America, the Schott Foundation for Public Education establishes a metric for determining the opportunity to learn for students. Providing a state-by-state comparison of both academic proficiency (percentage of students scoring at or above proficient on the eighth grade NAEP reading exam) and equity (as measured by the Schott Foundation’s Opportunity to Learn Index, or OTLI), Lost Opportunity identifies the four baseline minimum resources that are necessary for a child – regardless of race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status – to have a fair and substantive Opportunity to Learn.

In the United States, every student should have the equal right to a high-quality education.  But as our most recent data demonstrates, for far too many students, quality and equity are aspirations, not realities.  Few states are providing public school educations that result in academic proficiency for students.  And even fewer states are providing access to a high-quality education to all students, particularly those from historically disadvantaged groups.

More Latino Teachers Will Help More Latino Students Succeed

Posted on: Wednesday December 17th, 2014

By Samuel Acevedo, Boston Higher Education Resource Center

"If we know that more Latino teachers means more Latino kids will finish school, go on to college and live to their fullest potential, then we are duty bound to hire more of them." This post is the third in a series featuring testimony from a recent hearing hosted by Boston City Councilor Tito Jackson on how Boston Public Schools can recruit, train and retain more teachers of color.

This post is the third in a series that features testimony from a recent hearing hosted by Boston City Councilor Tito Jackson on ways to recruit and retain more teachers of color in Boston Public Schools. Read the first post, written by Councilor Jackson, here. Read the second post, written by Dr.

MA Charter Schools Suspend Far More Students Than Public Schools

Posted on: Tuesday December 16th, 2014

According to a new report from the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights and Economic Justice, 9 out of the 10 school systems in Massachusetts with the highest suspension rates are charter schools, with some of them suspending between 40 and 60 percent of their students often for minor misbehaviors like dress code violations or being tardy.

Charter schools in Massachusetts, particularly those in Boston, suspend students at far higher rates than traditional public schools.

Boston Youth Organizers Win Pilot Program for Subway Pass

Posted on: Monday December 8th, 2014

Thanks to the hard work of youth organizers in Boston over the past year, starting next summer, Boston will launch a pilot program to offer discounted subway and bus passes to students and help make transportation to and from school more affordable.


Photo via Boston Magazine

Getting to school shouldn't depend on whether or not you can afford a subway pass. Thanks to the hard work of youth organizers in Boston, the city will launch a pilot program next summer to offer discounted subway and bus passes to students. 

How To Give Every Student Extended Day, After School and Summer Learning Programs

Posted on: Wednesday December 3rd, 2014

Want more after-school or summer programs in your district? Well here's what it would probably cost to make that happen. The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center has released a policy brief outlining the costs of expanded learning opportunities and how we can make them available to each and every student.

Want more after-school or summer programs in your district? Well here's what it would probably cost to make that happen.

Regarding teachers of color: Boston Public Schools system is set to lead once again

Posted on: Friday November 21st, 2014

Tito Jackson, Boston City Councilor

In this interconnected world all children, and particularly those who stand at the margins, need a diverse teaching force if they are going to be able to be competitive globally. I’m glad to report that a seemingly contentious hearing yielded a true partnership between Boston Public Schools, local community members, researchers, and myself and colleague City Councilor Ayanna Pressley to create and implement an accountability structure that ensures we recruit, support, and, most importantly, retain highly qualified teachers of color.

This post originally appeared on the Hechinger Report and is reprinted here with permission of Councilor Jackson. The post is the first in a series that will feature testimony from a recent hearing hosted by Councilor Jackson on ways to recruit and retain more teachers of color in Boston Public Schools.

MA Senate Votes 'No' on Charter Expansion

Posted on: Monday September 1st, 2014

In a testament to the many parents, students and teachers who have been educating the public and policymakers about the potential consequences of charter school expansion, the Massachusetts State Senate voted to not lift a cap on the number of charter schools in the state.

MA Charter Cap Vote
Photo via Youth on Board

Across the nation, charter schools aren't short on supporters, which is why it came as a surprise in July when the Massachusetts State Senate voted to not lift a cap on the number of charter schools in the state.

Putting a Price Tag on Expanding Opportunity

Posted on: Tuesday August 19th, 2014

The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center and the Rennie Center for Education Research and Policy have launched a new project to put a firm price tag on what it would take to finally close the opportunity gap gap and ensure all students have the resources and opportunities they need to succeed

Massachusetts routinely leads the nation in test scores and high school graduation rates. But the state isn't immune to the same opportunity gaps (and resulting achievement gaps) that hinder students across the country, particularly students of color and students from low-income communities.

Lynn Community Takes Stand for Immigrant Students

Posted on: Friday July 25th, 2014

The small city of Lynn, MA, has become a local hotspot in the national immigration debate. On July 22, dozens of local parents, students and community members rallied on the steps of Lynn City Hall to protest city officials trying to scapegoat young immigrant students for the ails of a long-underfunded school system.

For education advocates and organizers, the small city of Lynn, MA, (just a short drive north of Boston) has become a local hotspot in the national immigration debate.

Fund Our Schools

Care about the future of public education?

Get the latest videos, resources and updates straight to your inbox:

Join Us

or skip signup