Minnesota

Annenberg Institute Issues Game-Changing Strategy Guide to Quality Teaching

Posted on: Thursday February 16th, 2012

Striding into the hottest topic in public education, Brown University’s Annenberg Institute for School Reform today issued “Straight Talk on Teaching Quality: Six Game-Changing Ideas and What to Do About Them,” a concise guide for improving teaching effectiveness.

The following is a press release from the Annenberg Institute for School Reform concerning their new, must-read guide to teacher quality in educaiton reform. You can download the PDF of the guide here.

What the Increasing Income-Related Achievement Gap Really Means

Posted on: Wednesday February 15th, 2012

By Michael Holzman, Senior Research Consultant, The Schott Foundation for Public Education

The growing achievement gap between rich and poor children, which has garnered significant attention from the media following a Standford University report, is being driven by rising poverty rates among children of color.

A recent research report by Sean Reardon of the Center for Education Policy Analysis at Stanford University has received much publicity, including a major article in the New York Times.

Vouchers - Overview




 Vouchers – as well as state-sponsored tax-credit programs that support private schools – are not the answer to ensuring America’s children have a fair and substantive opportunity to learn. These programs divert resources from public schools, affect a limited number of students and, most studies show, don’t improve children’s educational experiences.

Opportunity Gap - Overview

 


The achievement gap between White students and Black and Latino students correlates to the OPPORTUNITY GAP—disparity in access to quality schools and the resources needed for academic success, such as early childhood education, highly prepared and effective teachers, college preparatory curricula, and equitable instructional resources.

When dire statistics lose their shock value

Posted on: Monday February 6th, 2012

Worse than the dire academic and achievement statistics for our nation's male students of color is the notion that those dismal numbers (graduation rates, drop out rates, testing scores, etc) are repeated so often that they may be losing their shock value and, consequently, their ability to inspire action. In the February issue of Phi Delta Kappa Magazine, Pedro Noguera, the Peter L. Agnew Professor of Education New York University, criticizes education reform efforts that seek to "save" young male students of color by separating them from the rest of the population in single-sex schools or classrooms.

Worse than the dire academic and achievement statistics for our nation's male students of color is the notion that those dismal numbers (graduation rates, drop out rates, testing scores, etc.) are repeated so often that they may be losing their shock value and, consequently, their ability to inspire action. In the February issue of Phi Delta Kappa Magazine, Pedro Noguera, the Peter L.