New York

Hundreds rally in Albany to demand education equity

Posted on: Wednesday January 11th, 2012

On Tuesday, hundreds rallied in Albany on behalf of New York students, calling on New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to prioritize equity and educational opportunity in his public school budget.

A new approach to expanded learning time

Posted on: Thursday December 15th, 2011

By Lucy Friedman, Founding President of TASC (The After-School Corporation)

A growing body of research shows that the typical six-hour school day just doesn’t cut it for many students. Too many schools lack the time and funds for arts, recess or inquiry-driven projects that inspire a life-long love of learning and provide skills needed to be competitive in the 21st century. The challenges and needs are particularly dramatic in low-income communities where students are the most likely to be behind grade level and who stand to benefit most from additional learning time. ExpandED Schools is a promising new model to help reinvent schools that are struggling to deliver on the promise of high-quality education for all students.

A growing body of research shows that the typical six-hour school day just doesn’t cut it for many students. Too many schools lack the time and funds for arts, recess or inquiry-driven projects that inspire a life-long love of learning and provide skills needed to be competitive in the 21st century.

The challenges and needs are particularly dramatic in low-income communities where students are the most likely to be behind grade level and who stand to benefit most from additional learning time. 

NYC: More “good standing” schools for richer kids

Posted on: Monday November 28th, 2011

By Michael Holzman, Senior Research Consultant, The Schott Foundation for Public Education

Recent data continue to show that in New York City, the nation’s largest school district, a student’s opportunity to learn in a school “In Good Standing,” as measured by the state’s own tests, depends on the financial status of the student’s family.

Recent data continue to show that in New York City, the nation’s largest school district, a student’s opportunity to learn in a school “In Good Standing,” as measured by the state’s own tests, depends on the financial status of the student’s family.

Report details New York’s slide toward inequality under Gov. Cuomo education budget

Posted on: Wednesday November 16th, 2011

By Billy Easton, Executive Director, Alliance for Quality Education

Gov. Andrew Cuomo got the attention of public school advocates across the Empire State when he campaigned as “the Great Equalizer” for schools that would not be afraid to steer money from wealthy districts to poor under-resourced districts. But not only has he failed to deliver on that promise, but a new report details just how far in the other direction the state has gone since he was elected.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo got the attention of public school advocates across the Empire State when he campaigned as “the Great Equalizer” for schools that would not be afraid to steer money from wealthy districts to poor under-resourced districts.

It seemed reasonable to believe that as a self-proclaimed progressive candidate he would continue to keep New York schools on the path to equity started in 2007 after the successful Campaign for Fiscal Equity school funding lawsuit.

Most NYC high school grads not college-ready

Posted on: Wednesday October 26th, 2011

It’s a sad state of affairs when only one in four students attending high school in New York City are ready for college four years later, and even sadder that only half of those even enroll. But that’s exactly the state of affairs, according to the A-through-F high school report cards recently released. A recent New York Times article reported:

Those numbers, included for the first time in the report cards, confirmed what the state suggested several months ago: the city still has a long way to go to prepare students for successful experiences in college and beyond.

It’s a sad state of affairs when only one in four students attending high school in New York City are ready for college four years later, and even sadder that only half of those even enroll. But that’s exactly the state of affairs, according to the A-through-F high school report cards recently released.

A recent New York Times article reported:

Opinion: Time to fix our school funding formula

States: 

(Wicked Local)- Massachusetts has been a national leader in public education for nearly 200 years. We were the first state to provide access to free public school for all children, and, a few decades later, instituted the first special education program for students with additional needs. We have long understood that education is the key to a vibrant civil society and strong economy.

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Lost Opportunity 50 State Report

Publication Date: 
Wed, 2009-09-23
Type: 
Report

In Lost Opportunity: A 50 State Report on the Opportunity to Learn in America, the Schott Foundation for Public Education establishes a metric for determining the opportunity to learn for students. Providing a state-by-state comparison of both academic proficiency (percentage of students scoring at or above proficient on the eighth grade NAEP reading exam) and equity (as measured by the Schott Foundation’s Opportunity to Learn Index, or OTLI), Lost Opportunity identifies the four baseline minimum resources that are necessary for a child – regardless of race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status – to have a fair and substantive Opportunity to Learn.

In the United States, every student should have the equal right to a high-quality education.  But as our most recent data demonstrates, for far too many students, quality and equity are aspirations, not realities.  Few states are providing public school educations that result in academic proficiency for students.  And even fewer states are providing access to a high-quality education to all students, particularly those from historically disadvantaged groups.

OTL Allies Named to NYC Community Schools Advisory Board

Posted on: Tuesday July 22nd, 2014

Longtime NYC parent organizers Zakiyah Ansari and Ocynthia Williams have been named to NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio's Community Schools Advisory Board. Congrats Zakiyah and Ocynthia!


Zakiyah Ansari (left) of the Alliance for Quality
Education and Ocynthia Williams of United Parents of
Highbridgewere named to the Community Schools
Advisory Baord.

NY Teacher Tenure Lawsuit Gets Inequality "Completely Wrong"

Posted on: Wednesday July 16th, 2014

A new lawsuit in New York is challenging teacher tenure, but advocates and organizers point out that the case is merely a distraction from the real inequities that are hurting the state's public schools. Writing in the Times Union, Billy Easton (Alliance for Quality Education) and David Sciarra (Education Law Center) explain what the case gets right––and what it gets completely wrong.


David Sciarra (right) and Billy Easton at a press
conference in March presenting
findings from a
statewide fact-finding tour to document education
inequity in New York public schools.

Help Tell The Story of How Education Advocates Won the NYC Mayoral Elections

Posted on: Wednesday June 25th, 2014

Education was a center-stage issue in the New York City 2013 mayoral election thanks to the hard work of advocates and organizers across the city. Now those advocates are making a film chronicling their victory and they need your help! Watch the teaser trailer for "Vision to Victory" and help support the film's production!

Education was a center-stage issue in the New York City 2013 mayoral election thanks to the hard work of advocates and organizers across the city. In the run up to the election, a powerful coalition emerged that engaged the community, shaped the debate and eventually helped elect Bill de Blasio to office. 

Now those advocates are making a film chronicling their victory and they need your help!