Report

Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, Aug 2011
A new study by Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce confirms that the value of a college degree is increasing. The study shows that people with bachelor’s degrees earn 84 percent more over a lifetime than those with only a high school diploma, up from 75 percent in 1999. Read more>.
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Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, Feb 2011
A Center on Budget and Policy Priorities analysis shows that nearly half of all states have made "significant cuts" in public education, disproportionately affecting low-income communities and children of color.
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Alliance for Quality Education, Citizen Action of New York, Public Education and Policy Fund of New York, Aug 2011
The Alliance for Quality Education, Citizen Action of New York, and the Public Education and Policy Fund of New York, bring attention to the Buffalo, N.Y., public school district's strict out-of-school suspension practices for non-violent offenses. In citing statistics that show out-of-school suspensions have significant educational consequences, the report urges the district to adopt a “restorative justice” alternative that would keep students in schools.
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Timothy Bartik Pew Center on the States, Jul 2011
In a new brief from the Pew Center on the States, Timothy Bartik argues that investing in early childhood helps with job creation in the short term and also creates a stronger future workforce. His comprehensive model combines well-designed business incentives with high-quality early childhood programs.
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RAND Corporation, Jul 2011
This report analyzes the effectiveness of the Schoolwide Performance Bonuses Program, which is an effort to improve student performance through school-based financial incentives. The three-year study, which found that the program did little to improve student achievement, examined student test scores; teacher, school staff, and administrator surveys; and interviews with administrators, staff members, program sponsors, and union and district officials.
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Alexandra Usher, Nancy Kober Center on Education Policy, Jul 2011
The Center for Education Policy examines a decade’s worth of research on school vouchers, including the effects on graduation rates, parental satisfaction, public school achievement and the cost to taxpayers. Among the report’s key findings is that vouchers have no clear positive effect on student academic achievement. The report stresses the need for closer scrutiny of voucher research to ensure greater objectivity because CEP’s reviewers found that a majority of previous research has been conducted or sponsored by voucher proponents.
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National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Jun 2010
This report, conducted by the National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, evaluates the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program – the nation’s first federally funded voucher program — which was created to provide scholarships of up to $7,500 to make tuition for private schools more affordable for low-income DC families. The report finds that there was no evidence of a statistically significant difference in test scores between students who were offered an OSCP scholarship and students who were not.
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Jonathan Plucker, Patricia Muller, John Hansen, Russ Ravert, Matthew Makel Center for Evaluation and Education Policy, Feb 2008
This report, conducted by the Center for Evaluation and Education Policy, evaluates the publicly-funded Cleveland Scholarship and Tutoring Program – the nation’s second state-funded voucher program – implemented with the goal of providing low-income, inner-city families afford the cost of private school tuition. The report examines the program’s impact on student achievement, parent involvement, teachers and schools.
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Anthony P. Carnevale, Stephen J. Rose Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, Jul 2011
This report, by the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, finds that the U.S. has been underproducing college-going workers since 1980. As a result, the country is losing its edge as an economic world leader. We must add 20 million postsecondary-educated workers to the workforce to make this income inequality decline. We can do it if we make a concerted effort to improve levels of educational attainment.
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