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Education: escalator out of poverty

Posted on: Thursday October 27th, 2011

Tina Dove, Director, OTL Campaign

It’s no surprise that the voice of educational opportunity is spreading and growing louder as part of the Occupy Wall Street movement.

Education has always been the bridge to prosperity and opportunity for Americans. And it still is: The unemployment rate for college graduates is less than half what it is for non-college graduates.

But the nation seems to have forgotten this.

It’s no surprise that the voice of educational opportunity is spreading and growing louder as part of the Occupy Wall Street movement.

Education has always been the bridge to prosperity and opportunity for Americans. And it still is: The unemployment rate for college graduates is less than half what it is for non-college graduates.

But the nation seems to have forgotten this.

Effective teaching as a civil right

Posted on: Friday October 21st, 2011

No classroom factor is more important in the success of students than teachers. Unfortunately, that message often gets lost in today’s education debates. We are particularly concerned about the toll that the bashing of teachers, budget cuts, and pressure to produce test scores is taking on our nation’s teaching force.

No classroom factor is more important in the success of students than teachers. Unfortunately, that message often gets lost in today’s education debates. 

NO PLACE FOR KIDS: The Case for Reducing Juvenile Incarceration

Publication Date: 
Fri, 2011-10-21
Organization: 
Annie E. Casey Foundation
Type: 
Report

Putting young people in jail – particularly for nonviolent offenses – is a failed strategy, according to a new report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation that relied on decades of research and data. The report's most scathing findings include that youth incarceration does not reduce future offending; provides no overall benefit to public safety; wastes taxpayer dollars; and exposes youth to high levels of violence and abuse.

Annie E. Casey report: Jailing youths is a failed strategy

Posted on: Friday October 21st, 2011

Putting young people in jail – particularly for nonviolent offenses – is a failed strategy, according to a new report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation that relied on decades of research and data such as this: “Nationally, just 12 percent of the nearly 150,000 youth placed into residential programs by delinquency courts in 2007 had committed aggravated assault, robbery, rape, or homicide.” The greatest proportion of incarcerated youth – about 40 percent of the total, and disproportionately youth of color – are held in locked, long-term correctional facilities. 

Putting young people in jail – particularly for nonviolent offenses – is a failed strategy, according to a new report from the Annie E.

Unions balance needs of children and teachers

Posted on: Thursday October 20th, 2011

Deborah Meier

Schools have long been inundated with rules that stifle sensible practice and ostracize the professionals who work in them.  Up until the 1950s, married women in St. Louis were banned from teaching, and in Chicago if a teacher even looked pregnant she was ushered from the classroom. Since their inception, teachers unions have worked to abolish ordinances like these and address the shameful history of how teachers have been treated. Now, more than a century later, the unions still have much to combat.

Schools have long been inundated with rules that stifle sensible practice and ostracize the professionals who work in them.  Up until the 1950s, married women in St. Louis were banned from teaching, and in Chicago if a teacher even looked pregnant she was ushered from the classroom. Since their inception, teachers unions have worked to abolish ordinances like these and address the shameful history of how teachers have been treated.

America for Teachers!

Posted on: Thursday October 20th, 2011

John H. Jackson, President & CEO, Schott Foundation for Public Education

Here's an important question: What sector of public employees recently received a 71 percent approval rating from its core constituents? If you said elected officials, well, you are wrong. Give up? The answer is teachers. On the recent PDK/Gallup poll of the Public's Attitudes toward the Public Schools, nearly three out of every four Americans said that they have trust and confidence in the men and women who teach in the public schools. But rather than celebrating this exemplary review, too many Democratic and Republican policymakers and business interests are selling rhetoric and policies that blame and punish teachers for the shortcomings of our education system. This is similar to blaming a swim coach for not teaching kids to swim when none of the pools have water.

Here's an important question: What sector of public employees recently received a 71 percent approval rating from its core constituents? If you said elected officials, well, you are wrong.

Give up?

New School Year Brings Steep Cuts In State Funding For Schools

Publication Date: 
Fri, 2011-10-07
Organization: 
Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

Schools are receiving less state funding than last year in at least 37 states, and in at least 30 states school funding now stands below 2008 levels -- often far below. These cuts are attributable to the failure of the federal government to extend emergency fiscal aid to states and school districts and the failure of most states to enact needed revenue increases and instead to balance their budgets solely through spending cuts.

Starving America's Public Schools: How Budget Cuts and Policy Mandates are Hurting our Nation's Students

Publication Date: 
Thu, 2011-10-13
Organization: 
Campaign for America's Future, National Education Association
Type: 
Report
Category: 
Equitable instructional materials and policies

This report looks at America's Pre-K-12 public schools -- from the perspective of what Americans are reading and hearing in their local newspapers and media broadcasts. Sifting through these on-the-ground accounts revealed that there is indeed a growing crisis in America's public schools that hinges on two factors: state austerity budgets that cut funds from services to students and families, and new policies redirecting tax dollars meant for public schools to charters. 

At the Edge: A Survey of New York State School Superintendents on Fiscal Matters

Publication Date: 
Sat, 2011-10-01
Organization: 
The Council of School Superintendents

At the Edge finds that 80 percent of the districts surveyed eliminated teaching positions and more than half were forced to increase class sizes as a result of the state's $1.3 billion cut. It's plain and simple, school cuts HURT. The hurt is even greater because New York students are being robbed of learning opportunities as part of a budget pushed by Gov. Cuomo that gives millionaires a $5 billion tax break. Read and share the report. Stay informed. New York's example can't be repeated in other states.

 

Transforming Public Education: Pathway to a Pre-K-12 Future

Publication Date: 
Tue, 2011-10-04
Organization: 
The PEW Center on the States

This report, released by The Pew Center on the States, urges our nation’s policymakers to move our public education from a K-12 to a Pre-K-12 system. The report outlines how starting children earlier will be more effective in developing the knowledge and skills they need to succeed in school.